The Churches and Ethnic Ideology in the Rwandan Crises 1900-1994

By Tharcisse Gatwa

Foreword by Ian Linden

The Churches and Ethnic Ideology in the Rwandan Crises 1900-1994

paperback-logo

  • ISBN: 9781597528238
  • Pages: 312
  • Publication Date: 9/1/2008
  • Retail Price: $38.00
Web Price: $30.40
Web Price: $30.40

The Churches and Ethnic Ideology in the Rwandan Crises 1900-1994

By Tharcisse Gatwa

Foreword by Ian Linden

paperback-logo

PAPERBACK

  • ISBN: 9781597528238
  • Pages: 312
  • Publication Date: 9/1/2008
  • Retail Price: $38.00
Web Price: $30.40

About-

To many observers, Rwanda was a colony of the White Fathers. That Roman Catholic religious order, created in Algiers in 1868 by Cardinal Lavigerie, evangelized the country from 1900 onwards, effectively becoming the state church. To maintain its domination, the Roman Catholic Church's hierarchy supported the theory of the so-called "hamite supremacy" by selecting, educating, and establishing an elite among one of the three Rwandan social groups, the Batutsi, who were given the monopoly of power. Frustrations and recriminations that resulted from this injustice and its accompanying exclusion of other groups from power, led to the bloodshed of the uprisings of the 1959 revolution that preceded independence in 1962. Then, in 1959, the Roman Catholic Church abandoned the Batutsi in favour of the Bahutu majority.

From 1973 to 1994, both Catholic and Protestant leaders entered into close political relations with the regime of the MRND (Mouvement Revolutionnaire National pour le Developpement), which alienated them from the people of Rwanda when human rights abuses were widespread, culminating in the war in 1990 and the genocide of 1994.

If the church's mission remains that of teaching and evidencing love, justice and righteousness (Micah 6:8), there is the need for it to recover its credibility so that it can play its part in the healing and reconciliation of the country, and this can only be done through its confession and repentance of it failures and complicity in the tragedies.

Endorsements & Reviews-

"Tharcisse Gatwa invites us to look critically at arrogant and triumphant inhumanity in order to revive the flame of 'Ubuntu" (a superior sense of humanity). Such a call must go hand in hand with the celebration of what is accomplished by the "small rest" (those who never compromise with evil). This is what gives hope."
--Eboussi Boulaga, President of Academia Africana

"Gatwa's study is not simply historical. It also engages seriously with ways in which Christianity and Christian churches may even now fulfil a ministry of reconciliation in Rwanda. The Rwandan tragedy and its aftermath has lessons for the Church, wherever she is operating in the context of social conflict."
--Duncan B. Forrester, University of Edinburgh

"I have enormous sympathy for the sensitive and at times intractable task that Tharcisse Gatwa sets himself in this book and to which he brings the richness of his personal experience as a Presbyterian Church leader in Rwanda."
--Ian Linden, Associate Professor, School of Oriental and African Studies, London

Contributors-

Tharcisse Gatwa
Ian Linden

Bio(s)-

Tharcisse Gatwa of the Presbyterian Church in Rwanda is a journalist.

More in This Series-

see all »

Our ImprintsExplore our different imprints . . .-

View Our Publishing Partners »
Explore our different imprints . . . View Our Publishing Partners »
© 2016 Wipf and Stock Publishers. All Rights Reserved.