The Son of Man as the Last Adam

The Early Church Tradition as a Source of Paul's Adam Christology

By Yongbom Lee

The Son of Man as the Last Adam

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  • ISBN: 9781610975223
  • Pages: 188
  • Publication Date: 7/1/2012
  • Retail Price: $24.00
Web Price: $19.20
Web Price: $19.20
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eBOOK

  • ISBN: 9781610975223
  • Format: epub
  • Publication Date: 7/1/2012
  • Retail Price: $24.00
Web Price: $19.20
Web Price: $19.20
 

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The Son of Man as the Last Adam

The Early Church Tradition as a Source of Paul's Adam Christology

By Yongbom Lee

paperback-logo

PAPERBACK

  • ISBN: 9781610975223
  • Pages: 188
  • Publication Date: 7/1/2012
  • Retail Price: $24.00
Web Price: $19.20
ebook-logo

eBOOK

  • ISBN: 9781610975223
  • Format: epub
  • Publication Date: 7/1/2012
  • Retail Price: $24.00
Web Price: $19.20
Web Price: $19.20
 

*All eBooks are non-returnable

** Click here to review our ePub FAQ and policies.

About-

Most New Testament scholars today agree that Jesus used an enigmatic self-designation, bar nasha ("the Son of Man"), translated into Greek as ho huios tou anthropou in the Synoptic Gospels. In contrast, Paul, the earliest New Testament writer, nowhere mentions the phrase in his letters. Does this indicate that the Gospel writers simply misunderstood the generic sense of the Aramaic idiom and used it as a christological title in connection with Daniel 7, as some scholars claim?
Paul demonstrates explicit and sophisticated Adam Christology in Romans 5 and 1 Corinthians 15. In contrast, there is no real equivalent in the Synoptic Gospels. Does this indicate that Adam Christology in Romans 5 and 1 Corinthians 15 was essentially a Pauline invention to which the Evangelists were oblivious?
In this study Yongbom Lee argues that in addition to the Old Testament, contemporary Jewish exegetical traditions, and his Damascus Christophany, Paul uses the early church tradition--in particular, its implicit primitive Adam-Jesus typology and the Son of Man saying traditions reflected in the Synoptic Gospels--as a source of his Adam Christology.

Endorsements & Reviews-

"Scholarly consensus on the degree to which the Apostle Paul was dependent on the Jesus tradition has been hard to come by. With his appeal to Adam-Christ typology, specific features of the Son of Man tradition, and his emphasis on creative adaptation, Lee adds significantly to the case for important elements of Paul's dependence on Jesus."
--John Nolland, Trinity College, Bristol

"Scholarship is sharply divided as to whether Paul's writings represent a development of the Jesus tradition or are largely an innovation . . . Yongbom Lee's study makes an important contribution to this debate by arguing that Paul's Adam Christology draws on an early Church Adam-Jesus typology and the Son of Man sayings, now found in Mark 10:45, Matt 19:20, and Luke 22:30. It is an argument that deserves to be read by anyone engaged in teaching or studying the origins of Christianity, specifically the development of Paul's thought."
--Steve Moyise, University of Chichester

"Yongbom Lee's The Son of Man as the Last Adam investigates an important aspect of Paul's Christology and the early conceptions on which it is based. We are given a glimpse into a very early stage in the Church's interpretation of Jesus--the Son of Man--who, as the eschatological Adam, was recognized as God's Son and whose atoning death reversed the negative consequences of the first Adam's transgression. Lee's thesis is original and well supported by masterful exegesis and critical judgment."
--Craig A. Evans, Acadia Divinity College

Contributors-

Yongbom Lee

Bio(s)-

Yongbom Lee is currently an adjunct professor at Fuller Theological Seminary and Bethesda University of California.

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