• Home
  • religion
  • A Poetics of Postcolonial Biblical Criticism
A Poetics of Postcolonial Biblical Criticism Download Cover Request Review Copy Request Exam Copy

A Poetics of Postcolonial Biblical Criticism

God, Human-Nature Relationship, and Negritude

by Aliou Cissé Niang

Imprint: Cascade Books

232 Pages, 6.00 x 9.00 x 0.46 in

  • Paperback
  • 9781532617294
  • Published: December 2019

$28.00 / £21.00 / AU$38.00

Buy

Shipping Options

Buy

Buy

Buy

Purchasing options are not available in this country.

  • eBook
  • 9781498241922
  • Published: December 2019

$28.00 / £21.00 / AU$38.00

Buy

Shipping Options

Buy

Buy

Buy

Purchasing options are not available in this country.

  • Hardcover
  • 9781498241939
  • Published: December 2019

$48.00 / £36.00 / AU$65.00

Buy

Shipping Options

Buy

Buy

Buy

Purchasing options are not available in this country.

Other Retailers:

Telling in current biblical postcolonial discourse that draws insights from the works of Aime Cesaire, Frantz Fanon, and postcolonial theorists is the missing contribution of Leopold Sedar Senghor, the architect of Negritude. If mentioned at all, Senghor is often read through conclusions drawn by his critics or dismissed altogether as irrelevant to postcolonialism. Restored to its rightful place, Senghorian Negritude is a postcolonial lens for reading Scripture and other faith traditions with a view to reposition, conscientize, liberate, and rehabilitate the conquered, and enable them to reclaim their faith traditions and practices that once directed a mutual relationship between God, human, and nature--a delicate symbiosis before the French colonial advent in West Africa. A keen eye for cross-cultural analysis and contextualization enriched this volume with an intriguing reading of scripture, Ancient Near Eastern and Greco-Roman texts in conversation with other faith traditions, particularly Senegalese Diola Religion. As a Poetics of Postcolonial Biblical Criticism, Negritude is an optic through which people of faith may look around themselves, critically reread their sacred texts, reassess their vocation, and practice mutuality with God and nature on the heels of chilling climate change. Enshrined in this innovative argument is a call for introspection and challenge for people of faith to assume their vocation--human participatory agency.
X

Privacy Policy and Cookies

We have recently updated our Privacy Policy. This outlines how and why we collect, store and use your personal data when you use our website. Like most websites, we use cookies to improve our service and make your user experience better. See our updated Privacy Policy to find out more about cookies and how we use your data.

Okay, thanks