Connected Learning

How Adults with Limited Formal Education Learn

By L. Lynn Thigpen

Foreword by Tom Steffen

Connected Learning

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  • ISBN: 9781532679377
  • Pages: 290
  • Publication Date: 4/21/2020
  • Retail Price: $35.00
Web Price: $28.00
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eBOOK

  • ISBN: 9781532679377
  • Format: epub
  • Publication Date: 4/21/2020
  • Retail Price: $35.00
Web Price: $28.00
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Connected Learning

How Adults with Limited Formal Education Learn

By L. Lynn Thigpen

Foreword by Tom Steffen

paperback-logo

PAPERBACK

  • ISBN: 9781532679377
  • Pages: 290
  • Publication Date: 4/21/2020
  • Retail Price: $35.00
Web Price: $28.00
BUY FROM AMAZON.COM
ebook-logo

eBOOK

  • ISBN: 9781532679377
  • Format: epub
  • Publication Date: 4/21/2020
  • Retail Price: $35.00
Web Price: $28.00
BUY FROM AMAZON.COM
Web Price: $28.00
BUY FROM AMAZON.COM
 

*All eBooks are non-returnable

** Click here to review our ePub FAQ and policies.

About-

How does the world’s oral majority—adults with limited formal education (ALFE)—really prefer to learn? Few pause long enough to ask those who eschew print. The result of scholarly research and prolonged immersion in the Cambodian culture, Connected Learning exposes the truth about orality—the shame associated with limited formal education; the unfortunate misnomer that is orality; the place of spirituality, grace, and hope; and the obvious but overlooked learning preferences. ALFE have different ways of learning and knowing, a different epistemology and culture from print learners, even though we all begin alike. The choice is not between Ong’s orality or literacy, but between learning from people or from print.



Dr. Thigpen, a veteran cross-cultural worker, shares remedies for the hegemony and inequities unwittingly fostered by the literate minority. In a dominant culture where learning from people is prime, how can educators with a preference for print adapt? Providing an important tool in the Learning Quadrants diagram, Connected Learning advises teaching to the quadrant and calls for seven necessary shifts in teaching. Anyone versed in orality will admit these findings have “global implications and applications” (Steffen). The reader who heeds will positively impact a huge portion of humanity.

Endorsements & Reviews-

“Jesus has commanded us to make disciples of all nations—not just those who prefer a Western style of formal education. And if we are going to teach everyone, we are going to need to take the time to explore how they best learn. Lynn has made an excellent contribution to that conversation.”

—Brad Roderick, Chairman of Missions, Mid-America Baptist Theological Seminary



“As one who lived in Cambodia for sixteen years, I am thankful for Lynn Thigpen’s gleanings via entering the world of Cambodian adult learners. I am convinced that her research plays an important role in helping foreigners put the cross-cultural work back on their own shoulders, rather than unknowingly crushing the dignity of the local people by converting them to one’s own seemingly sacred learning models.”

—Jean Johnson, Director, Five Stones Global; author of We Are Not the Hero



“Being a consummate literate-preference learner, I used to struggle to grasp the importance of understanding orality and oral teaching methods. People like Dr. L. Lynn Thigpen are a huge help to people like me. She opens our eyes to the world of oral learners and shows us how to facilitate their acquisition of new knowledge, values, and skills. Dr. Thigpen’s book is a significant contribution to a growing body of literature on orality and oral learners.”

—Richard L. Starcher, Professor of Intercultural Education and Missiology, Biola University



“Lynn, and her husband Woody, have exemplified commitment to the gospel and a passion to communicate it effectively for over twenty years. Lynn’s research reflects that passionate commitment and fills an important gap of understanding about communicating to the large portion of our world who do not primarily learn through reading. I recommend this book to anyone who shares truth with the majority of the world, who learn best through informal, traditional, ‘connected’ learning methods.”

—Don Dent, Director, Kim School of Global Missions, Gateway Seminary



“Dr. Lynn Thigpen has written a deeply-researched and moving account of her journey to understand how adults with limited formal education learn—and the heart-breaking reasons why they often flounder. Her findings challenge conventional education and they point to promising alternatives. Along the way she gives a deserved critique to simplistic and mistaken descriptions of orality. I learned a lot from this book, it moved me, and I intend to make changes because of it.”

—Grant Lovejoy, Director of Orality Strategies, International Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention



“As an educator of the next generation of missionaries and ministers, I am profoundly grateful for Lynn’s research. Her decades of experience in one of the most difficult demographics adds a credibility to this project. Lynn’s research findings are indispensable for her immediate context and will provide a new paradigm that could have much broader global implications.”

—Brett Golson, Chair of the Department of Intercultural Studies and Christian Ministries, Associate Professor of Religion, William Carey University



“Those who want to transform the lives of oral learners should follow this study: understand the shame, isolation, and hopelessness oral learners face and then build relationships with them of trust, respect, and empathy. The result? An incarnational wisdom that non-readers have as much to teach as those who can read.”

—Daniel B. Lancaster, The Follow Jesus Project



“In this ground-breaking study, Thigpen explores the learning strategies of ALFE (Adults with Limited Formal Education) in Cambodia. Combining thoughtful scholarship with richly descriptive narrative, Thigpen’s research challenges traditional educational dichotomies through her compelling account of ‘connected learning’ along with its implications for more inclusive learner-centered educational models. An important contribution to the theory and practice of adult education, especially within today’s pluralistic contexts. Highly recommended!”

—Rhonda M. McEwen, Associate Professor of Education and Culture, Regent College; Director of Regent Exchange: Churches for the Common Good

Contributors-

L. Lynn Thigpen
Tom Steffen

Bio(s)-

Lynn Thigpen has served in various capacities in Southeast Asia for over two decades—in training and education, NGO work, healthcare, language and culture coaching, faith-based ministry, theological education, and leader development. Her passion for oral learners or adults with limited formal education (ALFE) led her to pursue doctoral studies at Biola University. An adjunct professor of Global Studies at Liberty University, she hopes to train the next generation of sensitive and competent cross-cultural experts.

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