Fear God, Honor the King

Magisterial Power and the Church in the Reformation, circa 1470-1600

By Andrew Allan Chibi

Fear God, Honor the King

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  • ISBN: 9781725256637
  • Pages: 360
  • Publication Date: 5/14/2020
  • Retail Price: $42.00
Web Price: $33.60
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Web Price: $33.60
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  • ISBN: 9781725256637
  • Format: epub
  • Publication Date: 5/14/2020
  • Retail Price: $42.00
Web Price: $33.60
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Web Price: $33.60
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Fear God, Honor the King

Magisterial Power and the Church in the Reformation, circa 1470-1600

By Andrew Allan Chibi

paperback-logo

PAPERBACK

  • ISBN: 9781725256637
  • Pages: 360
  • Publication Date: 5/14/2020
  • Retail Price: $42.00
Web Price: $33.60
BUY FROM AMAZON.COM
ebook-logo

eBOOK

  • ISBN: 9781725256637
  • Format: epub
  • Publication Date: 5/14/2020
  • Retail Price: $42.00
Web Price: $33.60
BUY FROM AMAZON.COM
Web Price: $33.60
BUY FROM AMAZON.COM
 

*All eBooks are non-returnable

** Click here to review our ePub FAQ and policies.

About-

From a medieval perspective, God had provided a church to shepherd believers toward salvation. It had a divine mission, a sacred history, a hierarchy of officers, and the intellectual support of respected thinkers. It provided a means for believers to interact with God. Believers also had to interact with neighbors, strangers, and their rulers. Fear God, Honor the King considers that sometimes surprisingly problematic issue. What is the correct relationship between the church, believers, and the ruling magisterial authority (whether alderman, mayors, or kings)? The thinkers of the Reformation era produced many answers. They explained in a variety of ways how the church related to, or fit in with, or was separate from, or was controlled by the temporal government of the realm, and they set into motion what became the determinant factors—social, political, economic, and philosophical—underpinning modern Western societies’ determination to keep the church and the state in well-defined autonomous cubicles. The Reformers’ rival ideas ushered in new philosophies (such as conciliarism and localism) as well as directly conflicting doctrines (such as Luther’s two kingdoms or Bucer’s co-terminus). This book examines, compares, and explains these new theories using the voices of the Reformers’ themselves.

Endorsements & Reviews-

Contents 

Introduction: Historical Survey; How Had the Church Gained Such Vast Temporal Authorities?

1. Luther and “Two Governments” Doctrine

2. Zwingli, Civil Authority, and the Church to 1536

3. Civil Authority and the Sectarians

4. Secular Authority in the Works of the Second-Generation Reformers

5. Civil Authority and the Church in Tudor England

6. Conclusion: Royal Ecclesiastical Authority in Catholic Europe

Contributors-

Andrew Allan Chibi

Bio(s)-

Andrew Allan Chibi is Director of the Distance Learning Association as well as an experienced professional and academic historian. His work has appeared in Historical Research, Archiv für Reformationsgeschichte, and the Sixteenth Century Journal, and he has written for Oxford University Press’s New Dictionary of National Biography (1995–2002) and Sheffield’s British Academy John Foxe Project. He is the author of The Wheat and the Tares (Pickwick, 2015).

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